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Hip Replacement

The hip is one of the body’s largest joints. If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting. Hip replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure that can relieve your pain, increase motion, and help you get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

People with hip joint damage that causes pain and interferes with daily activities despite treatment may be candidates for hip replacement surgery. Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of this type of damage. However, other conditions may lead to breakdown of the hip joint and the need for hip replacement surgery

Common causes of hip pain:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (a chronic inflammatory disease that causes joint pain, stiffness, and swelling)
  • Post-traumatic arthritis
  • Avascular necrosis (or osteonecrosis, which is the death of bone caused by insufficient blood supply)
  • Injury, fracture, and bone tumors
  • Childhood hip disease

During hip replacement, a surgeon removes the diseased or damaged sections of your hip joint and replaces them with parts usually constructed of metal and very hard plastic. This artificial joint, or prosthesis, helps reduce pain and improve function. In a total hip replacement, the damaged bone and cartilage is removed and replaced with prosthetic components.

When you may need a total hip replacement:

  • Hip pain that limits everyday activities, such as walking or bending
  • Hip pain that continues while resting, either day or night
  • Stiffness in a hip that limits the ability to move or lift the leg
  • Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports

The primary goal of total hip replacement surgery is to ease pain with secondary goals of improving motion, strength and function.

Before considering a total hip replacement, you may want to consider other methods of treatment These methods could include, exercise, walking aids, and medication. An exercise program can strengthen the muscles around the hip joint. Walking aids such as canes and walkers may alleviate some of the stress from painful, damaged hips and help you to avoid or delay surgery. However, if you have tried these treatments and can’t seem to find relief, or the pain is too severe, please consider coming in for a consult.

  • Hip pain that limits everyday activities, such as walking or bending
  • Hip pain that continues while resting, either day or night
  • Stiffness in a hip that limits the ability to move or lift the leg
  • Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports

Everyone heals from hip surgery at a differently. In most cases, however, you will be restricted to using a walker or crutches for 1 month after your operation. You will then be allowed to advance to a cane outdoors and no support around the house for several weeks. You will gradually return to normal function without any assistive devices. This usually takes about 3 months but may take longer.

Yes, physical therapy plays a very important role in your recovery. You should see a physical therapist soon after your operation and throughout your stay at the hospital. If you go home, you will likely need a therapist come to visit you or make appointments at a nearby physical therapy center. You should see a physical therapist about 2-3 times a week.

Normally we like to see how one hip does and then evaluate from there. But yes, you can easily replace both hips in the same year if the first hip recovers nicely.

Most hip replacements will last 10 to 20 years. However, every patient is different so there is no set number of years. A second replacement may be necessary.

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NASA Bone & Joint is a Board Certified Orthopedic Center. Our two physicians, Dr. O’Neill and Dr. Monmouth are both board certified in general orthopedics. Dr. O’Neill is also certified in sports medicine. Both doctors trained at Harvard and have been practicing orthopedics in the Nassau Bay area for 25 years.

Contact Us

Phone: 281-333-5114

Email: nbjs@nasabone.com

Address: 16840 Buccaneer Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77058

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